The Apprentice fired candidate Jemelin Artigas interview: ‘Ryan-Mark wouldn’t last one second in the business world’ – The Independent

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The Apprentice fired candidate Jemelin Artigas interview: ‘Ryan-Mark wouldn’t last one second in the business world’ – The Independent

The latest Apprentice candidate to be fired by Lord Sugar has been revealed, and she has plenty to say about it.

For the show’s seventh challenge, the candidates were tasked with creating an advertisement that positioned Finland as a summer destination.  

Things didn’t work out too well for the 34-year-old network marketing consultant Jemelin Artigas, who was sent home after being brought back to the boardroom by project manager Marianne Rawlins.

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Following Artigas’s firing, we spoke with the Venezuala-born candidate about ”game-player” Ryan-Mark Parsons, why she’s fed up of talking about the Lottie Lion controversy and her desire to inspire Latinas across the world.

Why do you think Lord Sugar fired you?

I think he failed to see how good I was and how much I put myself on the line. It’s hard for him because there are so many loud candidates. I think he’ll regret it one day, don’t you worry.

So, you wouldn’t say his decision was fair?

No, I don’t think it was! Over seven weeks, I was sub-team leader three times and project manager once. I was constantly putting myself out there, but not in an attention-seeking way. I felt like a lot of the other people were not doing much. Getting sent home is what happens when you put yourself in the firing line – it’s a big risk.

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1/16 Dean Ahmad, 20

Dean founded his sports management agency aged 15 and believes he is “the definition of an entrepreneur”, with confidence and emotional intelligence that are “off the charts”. He believes his “gift of the gab” could “persuade anyone to do anything”.

BBC

2/16 Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

Recruitment company owner Scarlett says that her upbeat personality means that people “will often buy into her as a person,” but admits that she sometimes struggles to accept help from others. Could this cause fireworks in the show’s infamous group tasks?

3/16 Jemelin Artigas, 34

Network marketing consultant Jemelin claims she is “1000 percent committed” to winning every task but warns that she can be “next-level stubborn” when it comes to getting her own way.

4/16 Souleyman Bath, 20

Para athlete and motivational speaker Souleyman trains with the Great Britain Paralympic team as a sprinter, having been diagnosed with Retina Pigmentosa aged six. “The less sight I have, the more imagination I gain, because what you see is what you see and what you don’t see is when the magic begins,” he says.

FIRED WEEK THREE

5/16 Lewis Ellis, 28

Lewis is a digital marketing project manager and describes himself as a “maverick”, who believes his competitiveness and determination will see him through the process. He adds: “I may not be the smartest guy in the room, but I’ll sure as hell work harder.”

6/16 Lubna Farhan, 33

Finance manager Lubna says she believes she has the “whole package” after turning herself into her own role model. A bookworm, the contestant describes herself as a “dark horse”, adding: “I came from a council estate… I have made myself into something good and I’m on my way to becoming something great”.

FIRED WEEK FOUR

7/16 Riyonn Farsad, 30

Events manager Riyonn invented his own card game which is part of his “little black book full of multi-million-pound ideas”. He says his personality is his best asset, but won’t let friends get in the way of coming out on top.

FIRED WEEK FIVE

8/16 Shahin Hassan, 36

Chartered engineer Shahin credits Elon Musk as one of his role models because he “thinks outside the box”, a quality he prides himself in having and thinks that his imagination will make him stand out from the other candidates.

FIRED WEEK ONE

9/16 Pamela Laird, 29

Beauty brand owner Pamela describes herself as “feisty and passionate” with a charismatic personality, which enables her to excel in sales. She says: “I love to be the under-estimated person in the room.”

10/16 Carina Lepore, 30

Carina owns an artisan bakery. She says she is a natural leader and that people latch onto her to benefit from the influence she carries. She believes it’s “written in the stars” that she’ll be Lord Sugar’s next Apprentice, describing herself as a “pocket rocket” due to her height (5ft 1″).

11/16 Lottie Lion, 19

Lottie the librarian says she is “very cut throat” and insists that she is no push over. She believes her poise and her “powers of persuasion” are her greatest business qualities, noting that people with bad manners anger her and that she gets frustrated when things don’t adhere to her high standards.

12/16 Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

Ryan-Mark is an award-winning public speaker who admires the Queen and describes himself as the “epitome of luxury”. Despite believing his best asset to be his ability to “forge a connection with anyone” he adds: “I’m not afraid to be ruthless when it comes to the other candidates.”

13/16 Iasha Masood, 27

Iasha is an account manager who thinks her “crazy, controversial, eccentric personality” will help her go far as she believes her “natural persona” will help her win. But watch out for her enemies – Masood is not afraid of keeping her friends close but her enemies closer, and she says: “I can read people just by looking at their body language, they won’t realise it until it’s too late – and checkmate”.

14/16 Kenna Ngoma, 24

Before creating his alcohol-infused ice cream company in 2018, Kenna played semi-professional football for Manchester City before that was cut short by injury in 2013. Kenna believes he is enthusiastic with an “infectious personality”, which he hopes will aid him to befriend the strongest candidates to help him build alliances.

FIRED WEEK TWO

15/16 Marianne Rawlins, 36

Marianne owns a risk management consultancy and moved from the US to the UK in 2017. She admits that she doesn’t have a filter and may need to “dial down her American-ness” and take a step back, as she says she can be too direct.

16/16 Thomas Skinner, 28

Pillow company owner Thomas started out in business aged 12, with a paper round, and later worked on the markets when he was 16. Since then he has set up his own pillow company, attributing his business success to his “sharp”, “street wise” character.

1/16 Dean Ahmad, 20

Dean founded his sports management agency aged 15 and believes he is “the definition of an entrepreneur”, with confidence and emotional intelligence that are “off the charts”. He believes his “gift of the gab” could “persuade anyone to do anything”.

BBC

2/16 Scarlett Allen-Horton, 32

Recruitment company owner Scarlett says that her upbeat personality means that people “will often buy into her as a person,” but admits that she sometimes struggles to accept help from others. Could this cause fireworks in the show’s infamous group tasks?

3/16 Jemelin Artigas, 34

Network marketing consultant Jemelin claims she is “1000 percent committed” to winning every task but warns that she can be “next-level stubborn” when it comes to getting her own way.

4/16 Souleyman Bath, 20

Para athlete and motivational speaker Souleyman trains with the Great Britain Paralympic team as a sprinter, having been diagnosed with Retina Pigmentosa aged six. “The less sight I have, the more imagination I gain, because what you see is what you see and what you don’t see is when the magic begins,” he says.

FIRED WEEK THREE

5/16 Lewis Ellis, 28

Lewis is a digital marketing project manager and describes himself as a “maverick”, who believes his competitiveness and determination will see him through the process. He adds: “I may not be the smartest guy in the room, but I’ll sure as hell work harder.”

6/16 Lubna Farhan, 33

Finance manager Lubna says she believes she has the “whole package” after turning herself into her own role model. A bookworm, the contestant describes herself as a “dark horse”, adding: “I came from a council estate… I have made myself into something good and I’m on my way to becoming something great”.

FIRED WEEK FOUR

7/16 Riyonn Farsad, 30

Events manager Riyonn invented his own card game which is part of his “little black book full of multi-million-pound ideas”. He says his personality is his best asset, but won’t let friends get in the way of coming out on top.

FIRED WEEK FIVE

8/16 Shahin Hassan, 36

Chartered engineer Shahin credits Elon Musk as one of his role models because he “thinks outside the box”, a quality he prides himself in having and thinks that his imagination will make him stand out from the other candidates.

FIRED WEEK ONE

9/16 Pamela Laird, 29

Beauty brand owner Pamela describes herself as “feisty and passionate” with a charismatic personality, which enables her to excel in sales. She says: “I love to be the under-estimated person in the room.”

10/16 Carina Lepore, 30

Carina owns an artisan bakery. She says she is a natural leader and that people latch onto her to benefit from the influence she carries. She believes it’s “written in the stars” that she’ll be Lord Sugar’s next Apprentice, describing herself as a “pocket rocket” due to her height (5ft 1″).

11/16 Lottie Lion, 19

Lottie the librarian says she is “very cut throat” and insists that she is no push over. She believes her poise and her “powers of persuasion” are her greatest business qualities, noting that people with bad manners anger her and that she gets frustrated when things don’t adhere to her high standards.

12/16 Ryan-Mark Parsons, 19

Ryan-Mark is an award-winning public speaker who admires the Queen and describes himself as the “epitome of luxury”. Despite believing his best asset to be his ability to “forge a connection with anyone” he adds: “I’m not afraid to be ruthless when it comes to the other candidates.”

13/16 Iasha Masood, 27

Iasha is an account manager who thinks her “crazy, controversial, eccentric personality” will help her go far as she believes her “natural persona” will help her win. But watch out for her enemies – Masood is not afraid of keeping her friends close but her enemies closer, and she says: “I can read people just by looking at their body language, they won’t realise it until it’s too late – and checkmate”.

14/16 Kenna Ngoma, 24

Before creating his alcohol-infused ice cream company in 2018, Kenna played semi-professional football for Manchester City before that was cut short by injury in 2013. Kenna believes he is enthusiastic with an “infectious personality”, which he hopes will aid him to befriend the strongest candidates to help him build alliances.

FIRED WEEK TWO

15/16 Marianne Rawlins, 36

Marianne owns a risk management consultancy and moved from the US to the UK in 2017. She admits that she doesn’t have a filter and may need to “dial down her American-ness” and take a step back, as she says she can be too direct.

16/16 Thomas Skinner, 28

Pillow company owner Thomas started out in business aged 12, with a paper round, and later worked on the markets when he was 16. Since then he has set up his own pillow company, attributing his business success to his “sharp”, “street wise” character.

When you were in the boardroom, who did you think was going to get fired?

Marianne was the project manager, but what did she do? I felt, from a professional point of view, I would have fired her. You can’t really tell when you’re in the boardroom, though. You just don’t know.

You clashed with Ryan-Mark – why did you find him so difficult to work with?

I have an eight-year-old boy and I can work better with him. I think he’s a great character, don’t get me wrong, but I found him really difficult because he kept ducking down when it came to taking the lead. But, when it came to doing the task, he wanted to take control and I don’t appreciate that. If he wanted to be the sub-team leader for this one, he could have put himself forward; he could have been the actor and the director, and he would have put his neck on the firing line. I’d have given him respect for that. I felt I had to take control in the Finland task, otherwise he would have done what Ryan-Mark does: thrown a little “look at me” tantrum and started playing up. I just said ‘No, this is enough.’

Would you say he’s playing a game?

Well, when I was project manager, I’d never even been to Cambridge or Oxford [on the sales task] – and he actually voted for me after putting himself forward! That was the moment I lost quite a bit of respect, because I felt like he was definitely playing a game.

Was there anyone else you struggled to work with?

To be honest with you, I was stuck with the same people. I was usually paired with Ryan-Mark and Lewis. I enjoyed working with Ryan-Mark at some points. When he was in a good mood, he’d make me laugh because he’s so funny, but, at other points, he was way too much – he wouldn’t last a second in the business world. You can’t have that kind of attitude and think you’re going to be a successful businessman. It’s just not possible.

Who do you think is going to make it to the end?

It’s really hard to tell at this point because you see people staying when they’ve done nothing, and then you see people going when they’ve done everything. It’s difficult to tell. I was quite surprised by Lewis because I felt at the beginning he was a bit immature, but then I actually worked with him and found he had a lot of business acumen and is quite clever. I think he’ll go quite far.

How do you think Lord Sugar is judging it this year? He seems to be keeping in some of the less professional personalities.

When I got fired, I was obviously gutted to go, but I also felt that I couldn’t see myself as Lord Sugar’s business partner. I feel like you have to have that sort of chemistry with somebody because you’re going to work together a lot, so you want to get on with them.  

What prompted you to apply to the series?

I wanted to inspire Latinas around the world. I think when we come to a different country, we feel it’s not our place to be successful, but if you’re proud of this culture and country, then you are within your own right to work your backside off and make it work. I’ve also always been a fan of the series. I felt what a lot of people probably do – that I can do it better. I soon found out it wasn’t that easy.  

What’s your views on the recent controversies surrounding Lottie?

I don’t really have views on that situation. I’m tired of talking about it. It’s really unfair to take the shine away from all of these incredible candidates, who have sacrificed so much to be on the show, to talk about something that’s pretty irrelevant. I don’t want to have any say in it, to be honest with you. I just think it’s not fair on the other candidates. I’d rather speak about them.

What advice would you give anyone who’s thinking of applying for the show?

Look, it’s not easy. It’s not for the fainthearted. You give up a lot of your life and pretty much do a 360. But it’s worth it. You learn so much about yourself and about other people, and the outcome is always positive. I always say to people, everything that’s worth having is not easy. If you’re kind, confident and have a big ambition, then go for it. Everything that’s worth having is not easy. And we need more kind people in this show!

What’s next for you?

Keep doing what I do: help other people to find success. I love empowering others. I’m doing quite a few talks. I came here when I was 16 and I didn’t speak any English, so I’m trying to spread the word that I’m grateful I was picked and that they gave me a chance.

The Apprentice continues every Wednesday on BBC One at 9pm

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