Jon Bon Jovi arrives at Abbey Road to meet Prince Harry – Daily Mail

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Jon Bon Jovi arrives at Abbey Road to meet Prince Harry – Daily Mail

Prince Harry today performed a duet with Jon Bon Jovi at Abbey Road Studios for a new charity single – before recreating the Beatles’ iconic zebra crossing photo outside. 

A teaser video shared by the Sussex Royal Instagram page showed Harry at the mic with Bon Jovi as they recorded the single Unbroken for the Prince’s Invictus Games Foundation, but cut out before he started singing. 

Harry later joined the Livin’ On A Prayer star and members of the Invictus Games Choir to pose for a photo on Abbey Road’s famous zebra crossing, which appeared on the front of the Beatles’ 1969 album.

It came as tourists watching the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace were treated to a series of Bon Jovi hits including Livin’ on a Prayer and It’s My Life. 

Scroll down for video.  

Prince Harry and Jon Bon Jovi recreate the Beatles’ iconic Abbey Road zebra crossing photo after recording a duet together today. The Duke was in George Harrison’s position while Bon Jovi was Ringo Starr 

A video of the two wearing headphones, with Bon Jovi strumming a guitar before beginning to sing was posted on the official Instagram page of Harry and his American wife Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex

Prince Harry teased his duet with Jon Bon Jovi on a post on the Sussex Royal Instagram page 

A photo of the Beatles crossing Abbey Road’s famous zebra crossing appeared on the front of the band’s 1969 album

Bon Jovi and the Duke of Sussex were joined by members of the Invictus Games choir as they recreated the snap in front of photographers  

A huge bank of photographers captured the moment, although many were held back by police behind a security fence  

Traffic on Abbey Road had to be held back while the photo took place. Harry seemed to be enjoying taking part in the moment  

 Thousands of tourists have pictured themselves on the crossing since the Beatles were first snapped there in 1969 

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (R), Jon Bon Jovi (second left) and members of the Invictus Games Choir pose on the crossing at Abbey Road Studios today

Abbey Road zebra crossing in St John’s Wood, London, rose to fame after The Beatles posed on it for the cover of their eleventh studio album, titled ‘Abbey Road, in 1969

Britain’s Prince Harry and Jon Bon Jovi pose for a picture with choir members during a visit at Abbey Road Studios in London

The couple announced in January that they would step down from their duties as senior royals, spend more time in North America and aim to become financially independent (pictured, talking to choir members)

Britain’s Prince Harry and Jon Bon Jovi pose for a picture with choir members during a visit at Abbey Road Studios in London

Harry returned to the UK from Canada this week to begin a series of royal engagements which are likely to be his last before he steps down from royal duties on March 31 (pictured talking to members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios)

Abbey Road: The iconic 1969 album cover  

Abbey Road zebra crossing in St John’s Wood, London, rose to fame after The Beatles posed on it for the cover of their eleventh studio album, titled ‘Abbey Road, in 1969.

The image, shot by Iain Macmillan, shows John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr walking over the crossing.

Since then, hundreds of thousands of tourists have flocked to Abbey Road to recreate the iconic image.

In December 2010, the crossing given Grade II-listed status for its ‘cultural and historical importance’.

The iconic Abbey Road album photo from 1969. Pictured, left to right: George Harrison, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and John Lennon

Harry returned to the UK from Canada this week to begin a series of royal engagements which are likely to be his last before he steps down from royal duties on March 31.

After telling delegates attending a sustainable tourism conference on Wednesday to just call him Harry, the royal was equally relaxed around the rocker who had a string of hits with his band Bon Jovi in the 1980s.

The two men greeted each other warmly on the steps of the world famous studio, where the Beatles recorded a string of iconic albums, with dozens of photographers, journalists and cameramen capturing the moment.

The prince and the popstar were ushered inside to the control room overlooking Studio 2 – where The Beatles recorded during the 1960s.

Engineer Obie O’Brien, Jon’s long-term friend and producer, was waiting to talk the prince through the process of re-recording the 2019 Bon Jovi single Unbroken with the Invictus Games Choir.

The single is in aid of the Invictus Games Foundation which oversees the development of the Invictus Games, the international multi-sport event for injured or sick military personnel founded by Harry. 

Unbroken was created by Jon Bon Jovi to shine a spotlight on veterans living with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and honour their service.

The musician has a close affinity with the military as both his parents served in the US Marine Corps. 

Crowds outside Buckingham Palace were treated to a medley of Bon Jovi songs during the changing of the guard ceremony. 

Harry and the rockstar had a private meeting and while in the studios recorded a video which was later posted on Harry’s official Instagram account.

The pair were seen in a recording booth with headphones on and Bon Jovi had a guitar. Just before they sang into a microphone the footage ended.

The duke later joked with an engineer: ‘We’ve been gargling next door, so we’re ready to go.’ 

Britain’s Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (L) and US singer Jon Bon Jovi gesture at Abbey Road Studios in London on February 28, 2020, where they met with members of the Invictus Games Choir

Britain’s Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (L) and US singer Jon Bon Jovi gesture at Abbey Road Studios in London on February 28, 2020, where they met with members of the Invictus Games Choir

Harry and Bon Jovi greeted each other warmly on the steps of the world famous studio, where the Beatles recorded a string of iconic albums, with dozens of photographers, journalists and cameramen capturing the moment

Harry returned to the UK from Canada this week to begin a series of royal engagements which are likely to be his last before he steps down from royal duties on March 31

The song, called ‘Unbroken,’ was created by Bon Jovi to shine a spotlight on veterans living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (pictured Harry talking to the Invictus Games Choir)

Britain’s Prince Harry talks to choir members during a meeting with Jon Bon Jovi at Abbey Road Studios in London

The pair were seen in a recording booth with headphones on and Bon Jovi had a guitar. Just before they sang into a microphone the footage ended. The duke later joked with an engineer: ‘We’ve been gargling next door, so we’re ready to go’

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex speaks with members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios, where a single has been recorded for the Invictus Games Foundation

The Invictus Games Choir, who are recording a single for charity, is made up of veterans and serving personnel from the British military. Proceeds from the sale of the record will go to the foundation that supports the Invictus Games, a sporting event for sick and injured veterans that is one of Harry’s favourite causes

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex speaks with members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios, where a single has been recorded for the Invictus Games Foundation

Engineer Obie O’Brien, Jon’s long-term friend and producer, was waiting to talk the prince through the process of re-recording the 2019 Bon Jovi single Unbroken with the Invictus Games Choir (pictured, Harry talking to the choir)

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex speaks with Jon Bon Jovi and members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios, where a single has been recorded for the Invictus Games Foundation (pictured, Harry with the Invictus Games Choir)

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex speaks with Jon Bon Jovi and members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios, where a single has been recorded for the Invictus Games Foundation

On Wednesday, the Duke of Sussex today embarked on his final round of engagements as a senior working royal as he launched a new eco-friendly travel firm in Edinburgh – and asked delegates ‘just to call him Harry’. 

Prince Harry, who will step down as a senior royal in less than five weeks, is in the Scottish capital for a ‘working summit’ of the Travalyst partnership, which will feature a grading system for users to track their carbon emissions.

Before he took to the stage, host Ayesha Hazarika, a former Labour adviser, said: ‘He’s made it clear that we are all just to call him Harry. So ladies and gentlemen, please give a big, warm, Scottish welcome to Harry.’

Harry flew to Britain from Canada on a commercial flight earlier this week and arrived in Edinburgh on an eco-friendly LNER train from London King’s Cross station last night, with taxpayer-funded Scotland Yard bodyguards.  

The 35-year-old Duke, who is officially known as the Earl of Dumbarton when in Scotland, has been stung by criticism over the past six months of his frequent use of private jets while campaigning on environmental issues.  

Harry’s flight to Britain this week was believed to have been the seventh flight the Queen’s grandson has taken so far this year – following return trips from Vancouver Island to London, Miami in Florida and Palo Alto in California. 

The Livin’ on a Prayer star (pictured arriving at the studio today) will talk Harry through the process of creating the single Unbroken, with the Invictus Games Choir

The Prince chatted with members of the media prior to the session with the 80s rock star 

Harry shakes hands with the star outside Abbey Road studios this morning before their session

The two men greeted each other warmly on the steps of the world famous studio, where the Beatles recorded a string of iconic albums, with dozens of photographers, journalists and cameramen capturing the moment

The Duke of Sussex looked in good spirits as he arrived at the studios, which were made famous by the Beatles 

The prince and the popstar were ushered inside to the control room overlooking Studio 2 – where The Beatles recorded during the 1960s

The Duke of Sussex has arrived at the world famous Abbey Road Studios, where Jon Bon Jovi has been recording a charity single for the royal’s Invictus Games Foundation

Jon Bon Jovi (right) greets the Duke of Sussex at the Abbey Road Studios in London where they will meet members of the Invictus Games Choir

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Jon Bon Jovi arrive to meet members of the Invictus Games Choir at Abbey Road Studios

The Duke of Sussex arrives to meet Jon Bon Jovi and members of the Invictus Games Choir at the Abbey Road Studios in London

His arrival comes amid an angry backlash today as Harry and Meghan’s £20million security bill looks set to fall squarely on British taxpayers after Canada refused to keep paying.

Canadian police confirmed last night it would stop assisting with security for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex when they step down as working royals and become private citizens after Megxit on March 31. 

This means the cost of round-the-clock protection for the couple and baby Archie will fall solely to the taxpayer-funded Metropolitan Police, despite the couple leaving the UK for North America. 

The force, which currently protects the couple at home and abroad – today refused to comment on whether they would continue to do so after Megxit. Buckingham Palace declined to say if Harry and Meghan would contribute any their own money for their protection. 

Royal expert Phil Dampier today said the couple should not receive public money for security when they become private citizens with their own income, which is set to be millions of pounds a year.  

‘It was only a matter of time before the Canadians stopped paying for their security because they’re no longer working royals and now obviously the burden will fall on British taxpayers,’ he told MailOnline. 

It is the first time Canada has confirmed it has been helping to guard Harry and Meghan since they settled on Vancouver Island last November. But last night it announced this would cease from April in keeping with their ‘change in status’. 

Canada has a legal obligation to provide security to so-called internationally protected persons. 

The Sussexes arrived there on a temporary visit in November as full working royals, and the Mounties gave them protection as they always have on such visits – with Canadian taxpayers picking up the bill.

But now Harry and Meghan intend to live in North America to pursue lucrative commercial careers and will quit as senior working royals on March 31.

Bon Jovi speaks to the media inside the studios before meeting the Duke and members of the Invictus Games Choir 

Prince Harry was in Edinburgh on Wednesday to talk at a conference for Travalyst, a sustainable travel initiative 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex together on a previous engagement. It is not clear where Meghan is currently, although she will appear at the Endeavour Fund Awards on March 5  

‘THEY should pay!’ UK taxpayers’ fury as £20m bill for Prince Harry and Megan Markle’s security bill falls entirely on UK after Canada refuses to pay it after Megxit 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were facing an angry backlash today as their £20million security bill looks set to fall squarely on British taxpayers after Canada refused to keep paying.  

Canadian police confirmed last night it would stop assisting with security for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex when they step down as working royals and become private citizens after Megxit on March 31. 

This means the cost of round-the-clock protection for the couple and baby Archie will fall solely to the taxpayer-funded Metropolitan Police, despite the couple leaving the UK for North America. 

Meghan Markle is pictured above taking her two dogs for a walk with baby Archie with Canadian security guards

The force, which currently protects the couple at home and abroad – today refused to comment on whether they would continue to do so after Megxit. Buckingham Palace declined to say if Harry and Meghan would contribute any their own money for their protection. 

Royal expert Phil Dampier today said the couple should not receive public money for security when they become private citizens with their own income, which is set to be millions of pounds a year.  

‘It was only a matter of time before the Canadians stopped paying for their security because they’re no longer working royals and now obviously the burden will fall on British taxpayers,’ he told MailOnline.  

UKIP founder Alan Sked was among social media users who today attacked the idea of British taxpayers footing Meghan and Harry’s security costs 

The prospect of UK taxpayers footing the bill sparked anger on social media today. 

UKIP founder Alan Sked tweeted: ‘So Canada will no longer pay the security bill for Harry and Meghan. We should certainly pay to protect them while in the UK or while representing the Queen abroad. But if they want to be independent celebrities in North America, shouldn’t they pay for their own security there?’

Twitter user Colin Murphy commented: ‘Of course they should pay. Since marrying Meghan H has become an arrogant money grabber. I used to respect his hard work and genuine care for our ‘heroes’. Now he’s disrespecting the British Public to feather Meghan’s nest. Go Harry, pay security!’ 

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